Ark-La-Tex Commitment to War in Iraq (IRAQ)


On September first, Draughn junior--a national guard sergeant-- died in Baghdad after a mine exploded. His family, and many other Ark-La-Tex families who's sons and daugthers have died in Iraq---are just beginning to grieve their losses.


(28.10.2005)

George Draughn and his son shared a lot, even their full names. Now, all Draughn has left are the memories.

"The first thing he did was cub scouts when he was real small. I wound up being cub master. Then it was was on to baseball--no football. I went to help coach the football team. Then I had to go coach his baseball team. But whatever he did i had to make sure to get in with him. So we were real close," says Draughn.

On September first, Draughn junior--a national guard sergeant-- died in Baghdad after a mine exploded. His family, and many other Ark-La-Tex families who's sons and daugthers have died in Iraq---are just beginning to grieve their losses.

"Fighting this war was something he always wanted to do--i don't know why, but he always wanted to do it," say BJ Britton, the brother of a Sergeant Bernard Sembly. Sergeant Bernard Sembly and Specialist Robin Fell, both of Shreveport---served together in the 156th. At the time of their deaths--Sembly's brother BJ Britton said his family could hardly cope.

"My dad, he's functioning. My mom is taking it real hard. She may be staying in the house for awhile. She's taking it real hard. She always told us, I don't want to bury any of my kids I want my kids to bury me," says Britton.

Tuesday---after the two thousandth soldier died in Iraq, we asked George Draughn what he thought about casualities.

"What a waste. What a waste of human life," says Draughn. Draughn tells us--the only peace he has at night comes from knowing one thing about his son:

"He liked what he was doing. He didn't like being over there--but he liked the military life," says Draughn.

Von: 26 October 2005, http://www.ksla.com

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