Ethiopian police launch manhunt for blast suspects (ETHIOPIA)


Addis Ababa had been hit by at least 11 explosions, some attributed to grenades, others to landmines, since January, including five in one day in March that killed one person on a bus and wounded 15.


(13.05.2006)


Ethiopian police said Saturday they are launching a massive manhunt for the suspects, who carried out a series of explosions in the country's capital Addis Ababa on Friday.
Federal Police Commissioner Workneh Gebeyehu told journalists that an anti-terrorist task force was set up within the police.
Workneh said the task force "is working day and night to come down hard on and uproot the terrorism straight away."
On Friday, a series of unclaimed explosions hit different parts of the capital, killing four people and injuring 42 others.
He described the explosions as "heinous acts aimed at intimidating and terrorizing citizens by stirring public peace and impeding the routine."
Repeated terrorist acts had been committed at various places in the country earlier, Workneh said, adding that those terrorist activities "had come under control to a large extent through a coordinated counter terrorism activities carried out to snuff the evil out."
Before Friday, Addis Ababa had been hit by at least 11 explosions, some attributed to grenades, others to landmines, since January, including five in one day in March that killed one person on a bus and wounded 15.
No one has claimed responsibility. But police blamed the Oromo Liberation Front and the Ogaden National Liberation Front for such acts. The two groups are fighting for greater autonomy for their regions.
The federal police chief said he is positive that "the terrorists who are out to threaten the peace and normal activities of the people will be brought to justice shortly. "
Terrorism cannot be used as "means to advance political whims," he said, and indicated that evidences so far collected were enough to fathom that the explosions are "orchestrated moves by anti- peace elements in the country in collaboration with Ethiopian enemies outside of the country."
Workneh hinted at insurgents from neighboring Eritrea.
The two countries fought a 1998-2000 war over their border, which is still in dispute. Asmara denies the accusations.

Von: Source: Xinhua , 14.05.2006, http://english.people.com.cn

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