Kadyrov Poised to Become New Prime Minister of Russia's CHECHNYA


Although major offensives in Chechnya ended by mid-2000, insurgents and troops still clash in small skirmishes and the separatists attack Russian troops and law-enforcement officers with booby-traps and land mines.


(01.03.2006)

The lawmakers in Russia's restive province of Chechnya voted on Thursday to support nomination of Ramzan Kadyrov, the son of Akhmad Kadyrov, the Moscow-backed Chechen president killed in May 2004, to the prime minister post vacated after Sergei Abramov stepped down earlier this week.

Kadyrov's candidacy was proposed by Alu Alkhanov, speaker of the People's Assembly Dukvakha Abdurakhmanov told the Itar-Tass news agency.

A day earlier, Alkhanov was quoted by ITAR-Tass as saying that he signed Sergei Abramov's resignation but hasn't decided on a successor.

Alkhanov said Tuesday that Abramov had resigned because of poor health following a traffic accident in November, but Abramov himself denied that, saying he stepped down to give way to Kadyrov, who is widely feared and currently serving as acting prime minister, The Associated Press reported.

Kadyrov, who heads a shadowy security force that many Chechens and human rights group say abducts and intimidates civilians, has been seen as likely succeeding Alkhanov after he turns 30, the minimum age for presidents under local law. He will be 30 on Oct. 5.

He is the son of Akhmad Kadyrov, the Moscow-backed Chechen president who was assassinated in a bomb blast in May 2004.

The contradictory versions of Abramov's resignation raised questions about a possible power struggle within the Moscow-backed Chechen administration as it tries to bring a semblance of normalcy to the republic where separatist rebels have fought Russian troops for nearly a dozen years.

Russian troops withdrew from Chechnya in 1996 following a botched two-year war, but returned in 1999 following Chechen militants' incursions into a neighboring province and apartment building explosions blamed on the rebels.

Although major offensives in Chechnya ended by mid-2000, insurgents and troops still clash in small skirmishes and the separatists attack Russian troops and law-enforcement officers with booby-traps and land mines.

Von: 02.03.2006, http://www.mosnews.com/

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