UN Food Agency to Help Lebanese Farmers (Lebanon)


ROME - A U.N. food agency will launch a $3.3 million program to help families in southern Lebanon restart farming disrupted by last year's fighting and the danger of unexploded bombs, the agency said Wednesday.


(08.08.2007)

ROME - A U.N. food agency will launch a $3.3 million program to help families in southern Lebanon restart farming disrupted by last year's fighting and the danger of unexploded bombs, the agency said Wednesday.
Fruit and vegetable farmers will receive fertilizers, seeds and other help to rehabilitate their greenhouses, the Food and Agriculture Organization said in a statement. Livestock keepers who lost their animals will be helped to re-stock.
The program will begin in September, the Rome-based agency said.
Mines and cluster bombs have killed at least 32 people, including seven children, and injured 208 injured, 68 of them children since hostilities between Israel and Hezbollah stopped on Aug. 14, 2006.
On July 25, a French peacekeeper working on a U.N. de-mining team was killed when an unexploded shell from last year's war blew up as he was trying to clear it.
The FAO said many farmers were unable to go back to their fields because of cluster bombs left over from the conflict. But the U.N. food agency said that, according to the U.N. Mine Action Coordination Center in Southern Lebanon, some 10 percent of the cluster bombs have been cleared, allowing farming activities to resume in certain areas.
About half of the working population in southern Lebanon relies on agriculture for a living, the agency said, estimating that about 50,000 families have been financially damaged by the war. Overall, damages and losses to the agricultural sector caused by the war amounted to some $280 million, the agency has estimated.

Von: www.forbes.com

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